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Open Source Research in Sustainability

Sustainability: The Journal of Record, vol.5 no.4 pp.238-243, August 2012


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Resource information:
Resource IDpearce2012
Resource titleOpen Source Research in Sustainability
Author(s)Joshua M. Pearce
Publication/ sourceSustainability: The Journal of Record, vol.5 no.4 pp.238-243
Date publishedAugust 2012
Summary text/ abstractMost academics, who as researchers and teachers dedicate their lives to information sharing, would likely agree with much of the hacker ethic, which is a belief that information-sharing is a powerful positive good and there is an ethical duty to share expertise by writing free and open-source code and facilitating access to information wherever possible. However, despite a well-established gift culture similar to that of the open source software movement in academic publishing and the tenure process many academics fail to openly provide the "source" (e.g. data sets, literature reviews, detailed experimental methodologies, designs, and open access to results) of their research. Closed research is particularly egregious when it could be used to accelerate the transition to a sustainable world and this transition is hobbled by antiquated research methodologies that slow the diffusion of innovation. To overcome this challenge, this paper reports on several experiments to embrace the use of open source methodologies in research for applied sustainability.
Library categoriesFOSS & Linux, Hacktivism, Simplicity
Added to Free Range Library15/10/2014
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file iconOpen Source Research in Sustainability [291.5 kilobytes]


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